Books - Journey To Komodo – Perth Scuba

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Books - Journey To Komodo

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  • Regular price $99.00


Featuring photographs from Perth Scuba’s very own Joey Pool and Dean Eldrid. Including photographs from Torbjorn Prestegard (the author), Gary Brennand, Ann Storie and Jonathon Heanes.

Any proceeds from the sale of this book will be donated to the Komodo National Park and its local initiatives.

Anyone who has spent time near the seas and the oceans will have experienced the beauty and the mystery of what’s hiding below the surface and the never ending waves and motion of the water.

We can sit for hours on the beach or on the rocks watching the ocean waves crushing towards the sand or the rock outcrops, being lost in time and space.

The oceans deserve respect for the enormous force that they represent. Moving many million cubic meters of water around the globe every second and controlling weather patterns and major environmental cycles on our planet, in extreme cases with deadly outcome for thousands of people.

The ocean reefs are home to over 4,000 species of fish and 800 types of coral and are key part of our ecological system without which our planet earth would not survive.

It’s the earth’s unique position in the Solar System and the properties of liquid water covering 71% of the Earth’s surface that has shaped the hot dry barren land into the Blue Planet.

The vast oceans remain relatively unexplored, and what science has researched to date of how the oceans work and the identification of marine life is just scratching the surface of what lies beyond the blue blanket of water we see when looking down from above.

We should all know the importance of the oceans, and even if only a small proportion of the world’s population is directly involved in making a living from the oceans, we can not afford to damage its existence or change its pattern since that would have a catastrophic effect on the sustainability of our planet. Coral reefs, often referred to as the “rain forests of the sea”, are among the most biological rich and productive eco systems on Earth and they are under serious threat of being damaged.